When I found out that somebody had leaked out a fully-playable version of the cancelled Warcraft Adventures: Lord of the Clans, the feeling was, to quote Danny Zuko, electrifying!

This is the game that laid down the origin story of Thrall, my favourite Warcraft character. This is the story that I’m adapting into a children’s book for my son (who is named after Thrall). I’ve been wanting to play this game since forever, so I quickly rushed to download the game.

But then the doubts kicked in.

Even as I browsed to the download link, I couldn’t help but wonder if this was something I should be doing. I’ve played every Blizzard game since Warcraft: Humans and Orcs, and I’ve been playing legit copies of the games since I got a job (which is Warcraft 3 and beyond). If I play this game, it would be the first time since Diablo 1 that I’d be bootlegging a Blizzard game.

wa01

You can try to rationalize it all you want, but playing this game will still be an act of piracy because you’re stealing.

Yes, it was cancelled and would not likely see the light of day. Yes, the game was just locked away and forgotten by Blizzard.

But put it this way: if you had sex with Tiger Woods’ wife, you’d be cheating. Even if he didn’t notice because he was too busy with 120 other women, you’d still be cheating. If a tree fell in the woods and nobody was around to hear it, you’re still shoplifting the pooty.

That said, Tiger Woods’ wife (well, ex-wife now) is incredibly hot and I love Thrall’s origin story and really want to experience it (the bits in World of Warcraft’s Caverns of Time aren’t quite enough). But at the same time, I want to do right by my favorite game developer and respect their decision to bury this game.

Thus, I’m honestly quite undecided about whether I should play it.

What do you guys think? Play, or take the moral and boring high road? Drop a comment below and share your thoughts!


Drop a Facebook comment below!

READ ALSO:  PlayStation 4 Gran Turismo Sport Special Edition hitting Singapore in October
Drew

Drew

Drew used to be a professional videogame reviewer, then he took an adulthood arrow to the knee. Now he is a content strategist, helping brands tell their stories without resorting to overused videogame memes.